topónimo

Chulimal

Tedlock (1996:189) translates Chulimal as ‘Mirror Side’; in other sources, it appears as Chulumal. According to Carmack (2001:233–34; see also 1981a:251; Contreras 2008:fig. 36), Chulumal is a Nima K’iche’ calpul whose name translates to ‘place of urine or oxidation’. Matsumoto (2017:187 n 124) suggests that this toponym may be equivalent to the toponym Chwimal recorded in the Utitulo rajawarem. Carmack (2009:117) transcribes Chuwi’ nimal, although Chuimal [Chwi mal] appears in Brasseur de Bourbourg’s accompanying translation.

Xelajuj

Observa Sam Colop (2008: 200n347): "Es el actual municipio de Quetzaltenango".

Christenson (2007: 280fn783) notes, "Xe' Laju (Below Ten). This is a contracted form of the full name of this site, Xe' Laju[j No'j] (Below Ten No'j—a day on the traditional highland Maya calendar). According to native chronicles, this was the principle settlement in the southern Quetzaltenango basin, although its precise location is unknown. Modern Quetzaltenango is the second largest city in Guatemala."

Saqulewab

La definición geográfica es más clara en el texto k'iche' que en la traducción castellana del padre Ximénez. Observa Colop (2008: 253fn346), "Esta es la forma plural de Saqulew, 'tierra blanca'. Se refiere a lo que ahora se conoce como Zaculeu, territorio mam".

Pa Maka'

Recinos (2012: 178fn34) define "Panacá, hoy Zacualpa" como un "pueblo del departamento del Quiché." Colop (2008: 200fn342) apunta que Pa Maka' significa "literalmente 'donde se recoge agua'", no obstante "es lo que actualmente se conoce como el antiguo sitio dond se ubicó Zacualpa, a dos kilómetros al sureste del actual pueblo," así citando a Dennis Tedlock (1996: 357).

Chuwila'

Christenson (2007: 277-278fn277) notes that Chuwi' La, literally "Above the Stinging Nettle," is "the site of the modern town of Chichicastenango, which at the time of the Spanish conquest was a Quiché community (as it still is today). The original Quiché version of the Popol Vuh manuscript was discovered here by Francisco Ximénez."

Ch'abi Q'aq'

Ch'abi Q'aq' is listed, together with Chi Junajpu', as one of the many communities conquered by Don Francisco Iskin Nija'ib', as recorded in Utitulo rajawarem ajaw Don Francisco Iskin Nija’ib’.  Matsumoto (2017:189 n 136) notes that "Edmonson (1965:19) defines Ajch’ab’iq’aq’, Chi Junajpu as a compound toponym referring to a single settlement (compare Ghabicoh Junahpu in Alvarez Arévalo 1987:40), but Recinos (1957:72n16) identifies it as a reference to the two volcanoes now known as Fuego and Agua, both in the Department of Sacatepéquez.

Chitemaj

(Chi) Temaj also appears in front of Wajxaqlajuj in a list of communities conquered by Don Francisco Iskin Nija'ib' as recorded in Utitulo rajawarem ajaw Don Francisco Iskin Nija’ib’.  In this context, Matsumoto (2017:188 n 128) notes that "Basseta (2005:497) defines tem as “beam, plant, and seat” and Temah as ‘tomar assiento’ (to take a seat), and Coto (1983 [1656]:304) notes that the phrase tin tzal temah is “composed of tzalan, something tilted, and tem, which is a beam” (compare “Plank Place” in Tedlock 1996:189).

Ch'ab'iq'aq'

"Edmonson (1965:19) defines Ch’ab’iq’aq’, Chi Junajpu as a compound toponym referring to a single settlement (compare Ghabicoh Junahpu in Alvarez Arévalo 1987:40), but Recinos (1957:72n16) identifies it as a reference to the two volcanoes now known as Fuego and Agua, both in the Department of Sacatepéquez. Carmack (2001:233, 239) also describes both Chab’iq’aq’ ‘fire arrows’ (or Tz’apiq’aq’ ‘closed fire’) and Chwi Junajpu as Nima K’iche’ calpuls. Tedlock (1996:189) translates these designations as 'Meteor, Hunahpu Place'" (Matsumoto 2017:189n136).

Xajbakyej

Recinos (1957:72n7) suggests that this place corresponds to the village Sajbaquiej in the municipality of Chichicastenango. Carmack (2001:233–34) characterizes it as a Nima K’iche’ calpul and translates its name as ‘deer bath’. In contrast, Tedlock (1996:189) translates the toponym “Deer Dance Plaza,” presumably interpreting xajb’a as an apocopated form of xajb’al, lit. 'place for dancing'. This designation also appears in a list of K’iche’ patrol groups elsewhere in the Popol Wuj (see Christenson 2003a:line 8094).

Tz'oloj Che'

"This is the K’iche’ name for the town in Totonicapán known today by its Spanish-Nahuatl name, Santa María Chiquimula (Carmack 1981:307; Edmonson 1965:28). It was the pre-Conquest political