persona

K'okamel (gen. 7)

Seventh generation of the Ajaw K'iche' lineage.

Christenson (2007: note 883, page 285) translates K'o Kame'l as "Lord Humble."

Septima generación del linaje Ajaw K'iche'.

Colop (2008: nota 405, página 217) traduce el nombre K'okamel como "honorable mortal", pues k'o significa "honorable" y kamel quiere decir "mortal."

Wuqub Aj (gen. 6)

Sixth generation of the Ajaw K'iche' lineage.

Christenson (2007: note 882, p. 285) translates Wuqub' Aj as "Seven Reed/Cane," so-named for the "day in the traditional 260 day calendar."

Sexta generación del linaje Ajaw K'iche'.

Colop (2008: nota 404, página 217) explica que el nombre Wuqub Aj quiere decir el "Día del calendario '7 caña'."

K'okosom (gen. 4)

Fourth generation of the Ajaw K'iche' lineage.

Christenson (2007: note 880, p. 285) points out, "The manuscript reads qo cozom. This is most likely K'o Q'osom (Lord Thicket/Bramble/Chaff) The precise meaning of this name is unclear, however, because of the limitations of the Latin alphabet used. Cozom may also be read as Kosom (Fatigued/Perplexed); K'osom (Reclined); or Qosom (Turkey Ruffling His Wings)."

Cuarta generación del linaje Ajaw K'iche'.

Q'aq' Laqam (gen. 3)

Third generation of the Ajaw K'iche' lineage.

Christenson (2007: note 879, p. 285): "Kaq' Lakan (Red/Fire Banner)."

Tercera generación del linaje Ajaw K'iche'.

Colop (2008: nota 401, página 217) sugiere que "q'aq' puede ser 'fuego' o kaq, 'rojo.' Laqam 'bandera' conforme Basseta."

Majuk'utaj Hombre

Christenson (2007: note 479, p. 184) translates the name of the deity, from whom the first grandfather of the K'iche' line takes his name, as "problematic." As he explains, "Carmack believes that it is derived from the lowland Maya word for 'Traveler,' or 'One Who Does Not Stay' (Carmack 1981, 49). Tedlock translates it as 'Not Right Now' based on the Quiché ma, 'not,' and jukotaj, 'right away/in a moment' (Basseta). Akkeren (personal communication) suggests that the name is derived from the Mam jukotaj (elder, eminent one).

Yakolatam

Christenson (2007: 284) translates the name as "Corner of the Reed Mat," noting in his explanation of Yakolatam Utza'm Pop Saqlatol that the name derives from Nahuatl.

Colop (2008: nota 355, página 252) indica que yako significa "levantar" en el idioma maya k'iche'.

Ajaw Awilix

Christenson (2007: note 552, page 198) translates the name of the deity Awilix, after whom the Lord of the Great House of the Nija'ib is named, as “you are watched over/cared for/commissioned.” He notes: "Throughout the text, the Quichés promise to watch over and care for their gods, providing them with offerings, sustenance, and worship (p. 290; lines 8344-8346, 8379-8388). Tedlock suggests that it may be derived from the Kekchi, kwilix/wilix, “swallow” (the bird) and reads the full name as Lord Swallow (D. Tedlock 1996, 297 n. 152).

Don Pedro de Robles

"Pedro de Robles is known to have taken office soon after 1554, therefore the Popol Vuh must have been written sometime between the years 1554 and 1558" (Christenson 2007: 29, "History of the Popol Vuh Manuscript.")