persona

Istayul (gen. 7)

Seventh generation of the Nija'ib lineage.

Christenson (2007: 283) writes the name of the 7th Lord of the Nija'ib line as "Iztayul." There is also an Istayul or Iztayul who is the 5th generation of the family line of Balam Ki'tze'.

Septima generación del linaje Nija'ib.

Belejeb Kej (gen. 4)

Fourth generation of the Nija'ib lineage.

Christenson (2007: note 873, p. 283) signals that the name B'elejeb' Kej or "Nine Deer" is a "day on the traditional 260 day calendar."

Cuarta generación del linaje Nija'ib.

El nombre del cuarto señor del linaje Nija'ib, Belejeb Kej, quiere decir el día "nueve venado" en el calendario maya (Colop 2008: nota 396, página 216).

Tekum (gen. 9)

Según observa Allen Christenson (2007: nota 849, página 276), el nombre Tekum, "is likely 'enthroned' based on the Nahua tecalli (throne, seat). Tedlock cites a Quiché dictionary compiled by Fermín Joseph Tirado in 1787 which lists tekum as a 'large, black butterfly that flies with great speed' (D. Tedlock 1996, 333 n. 195)."

Ninth generation of the Kaweq lineage.

Novena generación del linaje Kaweq.

Tepepul (gen. 6)

Tepepul first appears in the list of Kaweq K'iche' rulers in his association with Iztayul, in the sixth generation. Subsequent ruling generations share his name: Tepepul (who ascended in 1475) and Iztayub form the eighth generation, and Tukum and Tepepul are the ninth generation.

Tz'ununi Ja'

Tz’ununi Ja’ is the third woman of the first four women created by the gods. Christenson (2007: 202, note 499) translates it as "Hummingbird House," while Tedlock (1996: 290, note 148) translates it as something like "Water Hummingbird." For more information on this woman and the other three women, see the tema "The First Four Women."

Kaqa palo ja'

Kaqa Palo Ja' is the first woman of the first four women created by the gods. The translation of the name is generally associated with the sea. Christenson (2007: 202, note 497) translates it as "Sky Sea Horse," while Tedlock (1996: 290, note 148) translates it as "Red Sea Turtle." For more information on this woman and the other three women, see the tema "The First Four Women."

Kak'ixa Ja'

Kak'ixa Ja' is the fourth woman of the first four women created by the gods. Christenson (2007: 202, note 499) translates it as "Macaw House,” a name that Tedlock (1996: 290, note 149) believes is related to the Kaqchikel people (for more info on this, see tema “Kaqchikeleb.”) For more information on this woman and the other three women, see the tema "The First Four Women."

Chomi Ja'

Chomi Ja’ is the second woman of the first four women created by the gods. Christenson (2007: 202, note 498) and Tedlock (1996: 290, note 148) translate it as “Shrimp House.” For more information on this woman and the other three women, see the tema "The First Four Women."